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Alice Andrews

Alice is a writer and editor and teaches psychology and evolutionary studies at the State University of New York at New Paltz. Sheís the founder and editor-in-chief of The Evolutionary Review: Art, Science, Culture and the founder and editor of Entelechy: Mind & Culture; both journals bridge the arts and humanities with science, particularly evolutionary theory.


David Appelbaum

Purveyor of local geography and lover of mountain hikes, David Appelbaum holds a degree in philosophy. He is past editor of Parabola Magazine and currently, publisher of Codhill Press.


Mirza Iqbal Ashraf

A retired professor, has taught both graduate and post graduate students at Colleges and University†and has†lectured on cross-cultural religious and philosophical issues in his native Pakistan. Mirza Ashraf opened his eyes in a Persian-knowing family in the region of India which is now Pakistan. He has been reading and listening to Rumiís poetry since childhood. Studying his grandfatherís great work Miftah ul Aloom, a highly regarded six-volume extant commentary on Rumiís Persian poetry the Mathnawi, became for him the source of his inspiration and a contribution to his profound knowledge.†It helped him further to understand the unique concepts of Rumiís mysticism and unconditional love. He holds a bachelorís degree with Honors in Persian literature and Islamic philosophy, and a Masterís degree in English language and literature. His first book, Introduction to World Philosophies: A Chronological Progression, is popular in philosophical circles.


Christopher Bamford

Christopher Bamford is the editor-in-chief of Anthroposophic Press and Lindisfarne Books. A Fellow of the Lindisfarne Association, he has lectured, taught, and written widely on Western spiritual and esoteric traditions, and is a contributing editor to Lapis magazine. He is the author, translator, and editor of numerous books, including Celtic Christianity: Ecology and Holiness, Homage to Pythagoras: Rediscovering Sacred Science, and The Noble Traveller. An essay of his was included in the HarperSanFrancisco anthology Best Spiritual Writing 2000.


Frederick Bauman


Frederick Bauman has been involved in the literary work since the 1970s when he gave poetry readings at various establishments in New York City and founded a much publicized poetry reading series at Chumleys in Greenwich Village. In the 1980s he was a contributing editor for the literary quarterly Home Planet News. In the Nineties he turned to fiction, writing short stories. He is the author of two books of poetry previously published by Codhill Press: Feral Idylls (2010) and Enneagrammatic Improvisations (2007).He is also the author of Periwinkle (2001), a semiautobiographical novel of the Sixties. He is currently working on a new collection of poems called Lyrical Inquiries. He is married and lives in the Catskill region of New York State.


Karina Borowicz


Karina Borowicz is the author of "Proof" (2014), winner of the Codhill Press Poetry Prize and a finalist for the National Poetry Series. Her début collection, "The Bees Are Waiting" (2012), won the Marick Press Poetry Prize, the Eric Hoffer Award, and the First Horizon Award and was named a Must-Read by the Massachusetts Center for the Book. Her poems have appeared widely in journals, including AGNI, Columbia Poetry Review, Poetry Northwest, and The Southern Review and have been featured in Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, and Ted Kooser's "American Life in Poetry" Series. She has published translations from the Russian and the French. Trained as an historian, Borowicz also holds an MFA in Writing from the University of New Hampshire. She makes her home in the Connecticut River Valley of Western Massachusetts.


Tom Boswell


Tom Boswell is a poet, freelance journalist, photographer and community organizer residing in Evansville, Wisconsin. His poetry has appeared in Rattle, Poet Lore, The Potomac Review, The Dos Passos Review and other journals. He was awarded a Fishtrap Fellowship for poetry in 2006, with judging by Luis Alberto Urrea. His manuscript, Midwestern Heart, won the 2011 Codhill Poetry Chapbook Award. He also won first prize in the 2012 PoetryPort contest sponsored by Bookstore Number 1 in Sarasota, Florida.


Brenda Bufalino

Brenda Bufalino is a performer, master teacher, choreographer, author, actress, producer and director. Choreographer and founder of the celebrated American Tap Dance Orchestra, she has been a trailblazer in the renaissance of jazz and tap dance and a guiding force in the creation of countless tap festivals and workshops world-wide. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts and was recently awarded the prestigious Flobert Award, The Tapestry Award, and The Hoofer Award for contributions to the field and lifetime achievement. When not on tour, Bufalino divides her time between New York City and New Paltz, New York. She has two sons and five grandchildren, as well as thousands of students around the world.


Abraham Burickson

Trained in architecture, Abraham Burickson is a poet, essayist, and artist. He is the founder of the San Francisco-based performance group Odyssey Works and the Odyssey Lab Summer Institute. His poetry has appeared in many magazines and journals, and he has received awards and fellowships from the Michener Center for Writers, the Millay Colony For the Arts, and the Best New Poets 2008 Anthology. Currently an Artist-in-Residence at Cornell University, Burickson teaches writing at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco.


Laurence Carr

Laurence Carr, editor, teaches Creative and Dramatic Writing at SUNY New Paltz where he created The SUNY Playwrights' Project and was honored as a Teacher of the Year. Over thirty of his plays and theatre pieces have been produced in NYC, throughout the U.S., and in Europe. His prose and poetry have been published and performed throughout the country.


Patrick Carrington

Patrick Carrington teaches creative writing in New Jersey and is the poetry editor for the art and literary journal Mannequin Envy (www.mannequinenvy.com). His poetry has appeared in The Connecticut Review, The Potomac Review, Rattle, The Evansville Review, and many other journals. Rise, Fall, and Acceptance (MSR Publishing, 2006), his first full collection, is available at Main St. Rag's online bookstore (www.mainstreetrag.com).


Steve Clorfeine

Steve Clorfeine is a writer and performer whose most recent book, In the Valley of the Gods: Journals of an American Buddhist in Nepal, was published by Station Hill Press in 2001. His performance work incorporates his own writing as well as adaptations of Samuel Beckett, Lewis Carroll, T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, and Robert Louis Stevenson. He has been on the faculty of Naropa University, SUNY New Paltz and The Amsterdam Theaterschool. He lives in Accord, New York.


Heather Cousins

Heather Cousins holds degrees from Bryn Mawr College, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Georgia. She received a Phd in English and Creative Writing from the University of Georgia in 2009 and subsequently served as a Robert E. Park Postdoctoral Fellow in the University of Georgia's English Department. She won the Kore Press First Book Award for her poetic narrative Something in the Potato Room (2010). She has been published in numerous literary journals, including Pleiades, Cold Mountain Review, Cave Wall, and Southern Poetry Review, and several of her poems have been nominated for Pushcart Prizes.


Stephen Damon

Stephen Damon owns Browser Books in San Francisco.


Dennis Doherty

Dennis Doherty is Coordinator of the Creative Writing Program and Chair of the Poetry Board at SUNY New Paltz. NY. He regards the sky, studies nature, and swaps stories with friends over beer in their hometown of Rosendale. Doherty's essays, poems, and stories appear throughout the literary press. He is the author of The Bad Man, a volume of poetry.


Jane English

Jane English has a unique place in the East-West exchange of knowledge. Her photography conveys a deep connection to natural wisdom and was a major factor in bringing the Tao Te Ching to the widest circle of readers in the Western world. Her photographs formed an integral part of Gia-Fu Feng's historic translation of this work. Her publications include Chuang Tsu, The Inner Chapters, Finger Pointing to the Moon, and the Mount Shasta and Tao Te Ching calendars.


Heinz Insu Fenkl

Heinz Insu Fenkl is an internationally renowned author, editor, translator, and folklorist. His first book, Memories of My Ghost Brother, an autobiographical novel about growing up in Korea as a bi-racial child in the 1960s, was a Barnes and Noble "Discover Great New Writers" book in 1996 and a PEN/Hemingway finalist in 1997. He is also co-editor of the two major collections of Korean American fiction: Kori and Century of the Tiger. Fenkl studied Classical Chinese with Benjamin Wallacker, a student of the brilliant and eccentric Sinologist, Peter Boodberg. He is currently the recipient of a fellowship from the Korean Literature Translation Institute to translate the seventeenth-century Korean Buddhist masterpiece, Nine Cloud Dream. He has also published short fiction in a variety of journals and magazines, as well as numerous articles on folklore and myth. Fenkl was raised in Korea, Germany, and the United States. He lives in the Hudson Valley with his wife and daughter.


Frederick Franck

Frederick Franck (1910-2006) was the author of over thirty books, including The Zen of Seeing (Random House), and the award-winning Pacem in Terris: A Love Story (Codhill), as well as an editor of What Does it Mean to be Human (St. Martin's Press), recently translated into Spanish and Chinese. He was honored with the World Citizenship Award by the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, and his sculpture and artwork are in the permanent collections of The Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Tokyo National Museum, and other public and private collections.


Celestine Frost

Celestine Frost is an accomplished poet with many publications.


Joseph Giannola

Joseph Giannola works as a lawyer and lives the active life of a seeker of the world's mysteries.


Kim Gwang-gyoon

Kim Gwang-gyoon (1914-1993) started his poetic career by contributing to major Korean newspapers in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Considered one of the most prominent modernist poets in Korea, Kim often wrote in styles that resembled those of T.E. Hulme, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. Many of Kim’s poems written during the Japanese military rule over Korea deal with his concept of "painting-like poetry," depicting landscapes and ideas in vivid imagery reminiscent of William Carlos Williams' early poems. After Korea's liberation in 1945, and especially after the division of the country into North and South, Kim turned to lamenting and elegizing various sorts of loss--of his hometown, of his family members and friends, of his past loves and passions. He is also noted for the nearly forty-year-long hiatus he took from poetry following the Korean War; he did not return to the literary scene until the late 1980s. Among his major works are Gas Light, A Port of Call, Twilight Elegy, and Imjin Flower.


Mikhail Horowitz

Mikhail Horowitz is the author of Big League Poets (City Lights, 1978) and The Opus of Everything in Nothing Flat (Red Hill/Outloud, 1993). His poetry, short plays, and artwork have been widely published in the small- press world and featured in City Lights Journal, The Stiffest of the Corpse, Into the Temple of Baseball, Laugh Lines, and other anthologies, as well as in the New York Times. His performance work, with jazz and acoustic musicians and/or with his longtime partner Gilles Malkine, can be heard on a dozen CDs, including The Blues of the Birth (Sundazed Records) and the anthology album Bring It On Home, Vol. II (Columbia Records). He lives in the woods north of Saugerties, New York, with the printmaker Carol Zaloom and three cats. His day gig is impersonating an editor at Bard College.


Sibyl James

Pistols and Hearts is Sibyl James's eighth book. Some others include The Adventures of Stout Mama (fiction, Papier-Mache Press); Ho Chi Minh's Motorbike (travel memoir, Stringtown Press); In China with Harpo and Karl (creative nonfiction, Calyx Press) and China Beats (poetry, Egress Studio Press). She has taught in the United States, China, Mexico, and as Fulbright professor, in Tunisia and Cote d'Ivoire.


Carl Lehmann-Haupt

Carl Lehmann-Haupt, designer, painter, and writer, was a student of Martin Benson for a period of several years. He is currently at work on a memoir entitled, It's a Curious Thing.


Richard Lewis

Richard Lewis is a teacher and a writer--and the founder and director of The Touchstone Center for Children in New York City. Begun in 1969, the Center’s major focus has been to explore the imagination, and its relation to the natural world, as a source of learning and expression, for both children and adults.


David McCann

David R. McCann, Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees at Harvard, and his B.A. at Amherst College. He is the recipient of the Order of Culture Merit Award (2006), the Manhae Prize in Arts and Sciences (2004), the Daesan Foundation Translation Grant (1997), and the Korea P.E.N. Center Translation Prize (1994). His poetry has appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, Runes, and Prairie Schooner, and in the Pushcart Prize Anthology III. His books include Azaleas, Poems by Kim Sowol (Columbia University Press, 2007), Enough to Say It's Far, poems by Pak Chaesam, translated with Jiwon Shin (Princeton University Press, Lockert Library of Poetry in Translation, 2006), Traveler Maps: Poems by Ko Un (Tamal Vista Press, 2004), and The Columbia Anthology of Modern Korean Poetry (2004).


Susan Ellen Mesinai

Scholar in comparative religion and co-author of Shlomoís Stories (Jason Aronson, 1994, 2004), Susan Ellen Mesinai was chosen one of Columbia University's 250 "greatest graduates" for her search for Raoul Wallenberg and other foreign prisoners who disappeared into the Soviet Gulag after World War II.


Michael Meyerhofer

Michael Meyerhofer's first book, Leaving Iowa, won the Liam Rector First Book Award. He is also the author of four chapbooks and was recently the recipient of the James Wright Poetry Award, the Annie Finch Prize, and the Laureate Prize. His work has appeared in Ploughshares, Arts & Letters, North American Review, Southern Poetry Review, Green Mountains Review and others.


Ben Mitchell

Having and MFA in Poetry from Goddard College, Ben Mitchell has published more than fifty poems in literary magazines all over the US and Canada. Mitchell teaches writing in southern Vermont, where he lives with his wife Kathy, his children Nicholas and Lucy, three cats, two dogs and a hamster named Marshmallow.


Ed Mooney

Poet, writer, musician, and professor, Ed Mooney writes on Kierkegaard, Thoreau, Cavell, and the great Montana thinker, Henry Bugbee. He's rowed the San Francisco Bay and now teaches religion and philosophy at Syracuse University.


Rich Murphy

Rich Murphy has taught poetry at Bradford College, directed writing programs at Emmanuel College, and publishes widely in journals. He has three chapbooks: Great Grandfather (Pudding House Publications), Family Secret (Finishing Line Press), and Hunting and Pecking (Ahadada Books). Currently, he teaches writing at Virginia Commonwealth University.


Kim Namjo

Kim Namjo's dynamic use of sensual language and vibrant imagery portrays the subtlety of humanity and passion for religious life. Her work has received numerous awards and she has served as chair of the Korean Poet's Association


Elizabeth Rees

Elizabeth Rees is author of the award-winning poetry chapbooks Now That We’re Here (Spire Press, 2008), Hard Characters (March Street Press, 2002), and Balancing China (Sow’s Ear Press, 1998). Her poems have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Agni, Hanging Loose, Ironwood, Kenyon Review, Mid-American Review, New England Review, The North American Review, Partisan Review, Poetry East, Prairie Schooner, Rattle, River Styx, Southern Poetry Review, and Third Coast. She has taught creative writing at the U.S. Naval Academy, Johns Hopkins, Howard University, Boston University, and Boston College. Currently, she works as a Poet-in-the-Schools for the Maryland State Arts Council and serves as a writing consultant to PBS/Scholastic.


Anthony Robinson

Anthony Robinson grew up in the Maverick
Art Colony in Woodstock, N.Y. He served in
the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant (jg) during the
Korean War and joined the English faculty at
SUNY New Paltz in 1964.The Floodplain is his seventh novel. Robinson lives with his wife Tatiana in New Paltz & New York City.

Previous books published and awards won:
  • The American Golfer, Bluestone Books, 2010
  • The Member-Guest, Donald I. Fine, 1991
  • The Whole Truth, Donald I. Fine, 1990
  • Home Again, Home Again, William Morrow, 1969, two SUNY Fellowships awarded

  • Charley Rosen

    Charley Rosen is the coauthor with Phil Jackson of Maverick (1975) and the New York Times bestseller More Than A Game (2001). As a player at Hunter College, Rosen set numerous scoring records and has subsequently coached several teams in the Continental Basketball League. He has a Masterís degree in Medieval Literature and has written more than a hundred articles for publications ranging from the New York Times Book Review to Menís Journal, plus thousands of pieces for several sports websites. His previously published books included six novels and twelve works of nonfiction. He lives with his wife Daia in upstate New York.


    David Rothenberg

    David Rothenberg is a contributing editor to Parabola magazine and author of Sudden Music and Hand's End. His writings on spirituality, philosophy, ecology and music have been published in magazines ranging from Sierra and Whole Earth to Wired and The Nation, and are featured in The Best Spiritual Writing 1999 (Harper SanFrancisco) and The Soul of Nature (Penguin).


    Laura Simms

    Laura Simms is an internationally renowned storyteller, author, and recording artist whom Maori elders call "as good as our grandparents."She is the author of the award-winning children's book, Rotten Teeth (Houghton Mifflin) and the spoken word recording The Gift of Dreams (Sounds True) which Publishers Weekly called "spellbinding." A contributing editor to Parabola magazine and co-chairman of the National Healing Story Alliance, she has served as artist-in-residence at New York City's Lincoln Center for the Arts and travels around the world telling stories for adults and children alike.


    Jason Stern

    Jason Stern publishes Chronogram magazine, a regional magazine he founded in 1993. He has worked as a professional rock-climber, carpenter, salesman, writer, photographer teacher. His by-line follows the monthly Esteemed Reader column in Chronogram. Jason lives with his family in New Paltz.


    Barry Sternlieb

    Barry Sternlieb lives in Richmond, MA. He is the author of three previous chapbooks, and was the recipient of a 2004 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship in Poetry. Over the years, his work has appeared in Poetry, The Southern Review, Commonweal, The Gettysburg Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, New England Review, Quarterly West, Southwest Review, Poetry Northwest, and others. Nourishing a deep commitment to the old methods of printing, he also edits Mad River Press, which specializes in the very slow creation of handmade letterpress broadsides and chapbooks since 1986.


    H. R. Stoneback

    H. R. Stoneback, Distinguished Professor of English (SUNY-New Paltz), has also taught at the University of Paris and Peking University, and has lectured and performed (poetry and folksong) around the world. Renowned poet, literary critic, and leading Hemingway scholar of international reputation, Stoneback is the author/editor of twenty volumes of criticism and poetry and some 200 essays on American and world literature. His recent award-winning critical volume, Reading Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, was published by Kent State UP in 2007. Eight volumes of his poetry include Cartographers of the Deus Loci (Bird & Bull Pr), Singing the Springs, Cafe Millennium (Portals Pr), Homage: A Letter to Robert Penn Warren (recipient of NAS Triennial Award for Outstanding Book Length Poem 2005-2007), and Amazing-Grace-Wheelchair-Jumpshot-Jesus-Love-Poems (Des Hymnagistes Pr 2009). His poetry has won numerous awards and has been translated and published in Chinese, French, Provencal, and other languages. Editor of four poetry anthologies, he is founding editor of the Shawangunk Review. A semi-retired singer-songwriter (once active in such places as Nashville and New Orleans), he recently released a two-CD album, Stoney & Sparrow: Songs of Place 1962-2006, which includes fifteen of his songs.


    Douglas Thorpe

    Doug Thorpe is the author of two previous books, A New Earth and Rapture of the Deep: Reflections on the Wild in Art, Wilderness and the Temple, which won the David Family Environmental Book Award. He is also the editor of the anthology Work & the Life of the Spirit. He is Professor of English at Seattle Pacific University.


    P. L. Travers

    Born in 1899, P. L. Travers is perhaps best known as the author of the Mary Poppins books, but she also wrote extensively on myth and story. She served as a consulting editor for Parabola Magazine from its inception until her death in 1996.


    Pauline Powers Uchmanowicz

    Pauline Uchmanowicz is Associate Professor of English and director of Writing Across the Curriculum at the State University of New York at New Paltz. Her poems and essays have appeared in many national publications, including Ploughshares, Crazyhorse, Ohio Review, Mudfish, The Massachusetts Review, and Z Magazine. She has published scholarly articles in College English, Writing Program Administration, Literature and Psychology, and elsewhere. In addition, Pauline is a widely published freelance writer in the Hudson Valley, and a food columnist for The Woodstock Times. She was recently awarded a SUNY-wide Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence.


    Pamela Uschuk

    Pamela Uschuk holds a M.F.A in Poetry and Fiction from the University of Montana. Author of several chapbooks of poems, including the award-winning Without Birds, Without Flowers, Without Trees, her work has appeared in over two hundred journals and anthologies worldwide. She has released three books of poetry, Finding Peaches in the Desert, One-legged Dancer, and Scattered Risks. Her literary prizes include the 2001 Tucson/Pima Writing Award and the 2000 Struga International Poetry Prize, as well as awards from the National League of American PEN Women, Chester H. Jones Foundation, Iris, Ascent, The Wildwood Journal, Sandhills Review, Harbinger, and Amnesty International.


    Robert Waugh

    Robert Waugh, a professor of SUNY New Paltz, is the author of The Monster in the Mirror: Looking for H. P. Lovecraft and the author of many poems in small journals. For thirty-five years he has lived part of the time on Cape Cod.


    Christian Wertenbaker

    Dr. Wertenbaker has been a practicing physician for forty years, with post graduate training in ophthalmology, neurology, neuro-ophthalmology and neurophysiology. He is also a long time member of the Gurdjieff Foundation, and a musician.


    Rosanne Weston

    Rosanne Weston, a psychotherapist, has written for various newspapers and websites on family issues and public policy. The Glory and other Stories is her first work of fiction. She lives in New York City with her husband and their colorful art collection.


    Alicia Wirt-Fox

    Alicia Wirt-Fox received her BFA from Parsons School of Design and her MFA from Yale University School of Art. She has exhibited her paintings in numerous group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe. She is a recipient of the 19th Annual Richard Kelly Grant for her experimental work utilizing reflective light and color within the context of painting and sculpture. For over a decade, she has worked as a graphic designer in the publishing industry and has been involved in the development, design and creation of many books for education. Missives is her first book combining both her writing and images. She currently lives and works in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.


    Song Yong

    Born in Youngkwang, Korea in 1940, Song Yong studied German language and literature at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. After several years as a fugitive from compulsory military duty, he was arrested and sent to prison, but was released by a sympathetic judge who had learned that he was a writer. His first short story, "Cock-Fighting," was published in Changbi Magazine in 1967; he has since published several books of fiction and nonfiction.


    Harold A. Zlotnik

    Harold A. Zlotnik (1914-) is a poet who has been published in The Saturday Review of Literature, The American Scholar, English Journal, Kaleidograph, The New York Times, The Herald Tribune, Washington Post, and other periodicals. He is a retired educator, formerly with the New York City Board of Education where he served as Director of English, as Coordinator of High School English Curriculum, and as Coordinator of the landmark program, Poets in the Schools, developed through a collaboration between The Academy of American Poets and the Board of Education, City of New York. While he served as director of this program, he developed in-service workshops for teachers that featured such illustrious poets as John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Stanley Kunitz, and Adrienne Rich. His latest volume, Toys of Desperation: A Haymarket Mural in Verse (1987), an epic poem about The Haymarket Affair, is a featured text at the Illinois History Society. He also won First Prize in the Poets of the Palm Beaches National Contest for the sonnet, “August,” and his poems have been featured in the association’s yearly anthology.